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      aubrey beardsley



      AUBREY BEARDSLEY - The Black Cape, 1894

    • AUBREY BEARDSLEY
      The Black Cape (1894)
      (Negative Image)



      biography



    • BEARDSLEY, Aubrey Vincent
      (1872-1898)





      Artist

        A brilliant black and white illustrator who died at a young age – an English Art Nouveau icon. At the age of seven Beardsley was diagnosed with tuberculoses, which many see as a possible explanation for his unbridled urge to express himself.

      Without any education in arts he developed his passionate style of drawing, averse to the social and political equalization, and not being socially engaged as many of his contemporaries. Beardsley admired the pre-Raphaelites’ traditional, distant style and the thought provoking two-dimensional Japanese art of drawing, which subsequently had a sexual lack of inhibition which was unthinkable in prudish Victorian England. Along the lines of the Fin-de-Siècle he cultivated ugliness to a ruthless aestheticism of decadence, like Baudelaire did in his Fleurs du Mal.

      In his own words:

        “I struck out a new style and method of work which was founded on Japanese art but quite original. It is extremely fantastic in conception but perfectly severe in execution”.

      The Studio magazine published his drawings which earned him some recognition, but certainly yielded no wide recognition. It did give him the opportunity to resign from his job at the office and devote himself entirely to the art of drawing. He got assignments for book illustrations and got involved with the successful artistic literary magazine The Yellow Book. In 1896 he and formal solicitor Smithers founded the magazine The Savoy.

      Two years later he died of tuberculoses.

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    • FREDERICK EVANS
      Aubrey Beardsley
      (1895)



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    • BEARDSLEY, Aubrey Vincent
      (1872-1898)


      Biog. II

        He was an illustrator whose highly-wrought, stylized black and white drawings exude a typically fin-de-siecle atmosphere of decadence and express perfectly the Art Nouveau of which they were an ingredient.

      He is best known for his work on The Yellow Book in 1894, and for illustrations to Wilde's Salome, and Pope's Rape of the Lock.

      There are drawings in London (V&A, Tate).

    • Source: The Penguin Dictionary of Art and Artists (Penguin Reference Books)

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    • FREDERICK EVANS
      Aubrey Beardsley
      (1895)



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    • BEARDSLEY, Aubrey Vincent
      (1872-1898)



      Biog. III

        Born in 1872 at Buckingham Road in Brighton, he died in 1898 at Menton near Monte Carlo.

      Beardsley worked as a city clerk but on the advice of Sir Edward Burne-Jones took up art full time. Most of his highly distinctive work in black and white made him one of the best known Art Nouveau artists. Beardsley achieved notoriety by illustrating Salome by Oscar Wilde and had a reputation for being decadent. He also illustrated Dent’s edition of Morte d’Arthur and both the Yellow Book and The Studio.

      Beardsley was encouraged by his mother who also taught him to play the piano before he was five and he composed nocturnes before he was ten. He went to Brighton Grammar School and although poor at maths, excelled in the arts. A companion of his at the school was Charles Cochran who became a well-known impresario.

      Beardsley was tainted by his association with Wilde but his reputation recovered through his beautiful religious drawings including one of the Virgin and Child. He was eventually received into the Roman Catholic Church in the year before his death.

      Most of his work is in the Victoria and Albert Museum.

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      The Studio Volume Two (Oct.1893): Illustration for review of Oscar Wilde’s Salome, illustrated by Aubrey Beardsley

    • AUBREY BEARDSLEY
      The Studio Volume Two
      (Oct.1893)

      Illustration for review of
      Oscar Wilde’s Salome





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      Fifty drawings by Aubrey Beardsley, book, 1920. The cover design for Le Morte Darthur, illustrated by Aubrey Beardsley and published in parts by J.M. Dent and Co. 

This image is taken from the 1972 Dover Pictorial Archive Series edition of Beardsley's Illustrations for Le Morte D'Arthur
The opening page from Le Morte Darthur, illustrated by Aubrey Beardsley and published in parts by J.M. Dent and Co. 

This image is taken from the 1972 Dover Pictorial Archive Series edition of Beardsley's Illustrations for Le Morte D'Arthur
A full page illustration for Le Morte Darthur. Note the relationship between illustration, decorative border and text.

This image is taken from the 1972 Dover Pictorial Archive Series edition of Beardsley's Illustrations for Le Morte D'Arthur. AUBREY BEARDSLEY (1872-1898)
THE SPOTTED DRESS AUBREY BEARDSLEY (1872-1898)
TAKING A BOW
      Aubrey Beardsley Aubrey Beardsley
Aubrey Beardsley The Savoy Title:  The Dancer's Reward, for Salome, 1893 
Artist: Aubrey Beardsley Title:  Ali Baba (Cover Design for The Forty Thieves), 1897 
Artist: Aubrey Beardsley Title:  Illustration from Lysistrata by Aristophanes 
Artist: Aubrey Beardsley
      Title:  Arthur and the Strange Mantle 
Artist: Aubrey Beardsley Title:  The Holy Grail is Achieved 
Artist: Aubrey Beardsley Title:  The Toilette of Salome 
Artist: Aubrey Beardsley Title:  Salome 
Artist: Aubrey Beardsley Title:  Seated Woman 
Artist: Aubrey Beardsley Title:  How Sir Lancelot Was Recognized by Lady Elaine 
Artist: Aubrey Beardsley
      Title:  Cinesias Entreating Myrrhina to Coition, Illustration from Lysistrata by Aristophanes 1896 
Artist: Aubrey Beardsley Title:  Illustration from Lysistrata by Aristophanes 
Artist: Aubrey Beardsley Title:  Front Cover of the Prospectus for The Yellow Book, 1894 
Artist: Aubrey Beardsley Title:  Juvenal Scourging Woman, Illustration from Title:  Bathyllus Posturing, Illustration from Title:  Lucian's Strange Creatures, Illustration from
      Title:  Caricature of Felix Mendelssohn, Late 19th Century 
Artist: Aubrey Beardsley Title:  La Beale Isoud at Joyous Gard, Illustration from Le Morte D'Arthur, Published 1894 
Artist: Aubrey Beardsley Title:  Morgan Le Fay Gives a Shield to Sir Tristram 
Artist: Aubrey Beardsley Title:  The Achieving of the Sangreal, from Le Morte D'Arthur by Sir Thomas Malory Published 1893-94 
Artist: Aubrey Beardsley Title:  Original Sketch for the Cover of Salome by Oscar Wilde circa 1894 
Artist: Aubrey Beardsley Title:  J'Ai Baise Ta Bouche, Jokanaan, Illustration from Salome by Oscar Wilde, Pub. 1894 
Artist: Aubrey Beardsley





      ART RARITIES STORE





      AUBREY BEARDSLEY (1872-1898)
DEMON IN EVENING DRESS

    • AUBREY BEARDSLEY
      Demon in Evening Dress (1893)





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      art AUBREY BEARDSLEY
      Black Cape

      Sculpture

      Superb. Sculpture originally of a figure from the 1894 illustration by the same title by Art Nouveau artist Aubrey Beardsley.

      • Medium: Collectible quality resin with hand-painted color details, matte and glossy finish
      • Dimensions: 7.5 in. x 5 in. x 3 in.
      • Condition: New in box
      • Date of Creation: 1990-Now
      • Origin: Europe
      • Manufactured by: Parastone Mouseion

    • Included: Full color card with image of original artwork. Description card about artist and artwork. Both cards are in four languages.

      Beautifully rendered and constructed of fine collectible quality resin.

      Beardsley completed this illustration for the leading character Salome in Oscar Wilde's play. The lower image at left is the original illustration from which this sculpture was based.

      The stylish dress is reminiscent of a butterfly with exaggerated sleeves and flowing skirt. From the Oxford Dictionary, a Beardsley scholar, Milly Heyd, discusses the use of the butterfly in other Beardsley works and the use of a butterfly as Whistler's signature. According to Heyd, the butterfly symbolizes independence and also has been defined by the Oxford dictionary as a term used to describe "a vain gaudily attired person". Beardsley perhaps creates a complex image of Salome in which she attempts to dress to reflect her independence yet her attempt is in vain, as she ends up appearing ridiculously at the mercy of her unmerciful dress. (see original picture).

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      Try: amazon.com (beardsley black cape page - sculptures sometimes appear on this page)


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